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Posts for: January, 2021

By Womens Health Care of Warren
January 28, 2021
Category: Pregnancy Care
Bleeding During Your PregnancyA Google search will show you thousands upon thousands of women who are wondering whether bleeding is okay during pregnancy. We understand that bleeding can be scary, especially if you aren’t sure what’s causing it. Here’s what you should know about bleeding, including when to turn to an OBGYN.

Bleeding During Your First Trimester

Your body is going through a ton of changes, especially during the first trimester. So it shouldn’t come as much of a surprise that as many as 30 percent of women experience some sort of spotting or light bleeding during early pregnancy. Some of the causes of light bleeding or spotting include,

Implantation bleeding: After about 6 to 12 days after conception, some women experience cramping and light spotting. This is known as implantation bleeding. While some women may assume that their period is coming (since implantation bleeding usually appears a few days before a woman’s period), implantation bleeding is very light and may cause pink or brown spotting that may only last a day or two.
Cervical polyps: These (often) benign polyps are common in women and can lead to inflammation and spots of bright red blood. You may not experience any other symptoms apart from light bleeding, but your OBGYN can diagnose polyps during a pelvic exam.
Pelvic exams, intercourse, or infection: Anything that may irritate the cervix may result in bleeding. This includes infections, intercourse, or a pelvic exam. If you notice some drops of bright red blood after intercourse or a pelvic exam, don’t worry. It will go away on its own.

Bleeding During Second and Third Trimester

While light bleeding is fairly normal during the first trimester, it’s less common and more likely to be a concern if there is bleeding in the second or third trimester. If you are bleeding during your second or third trimester it’s best to talk with your OBGYN as it could be a sign of,
  • Placental abruption
  • Problems with the cervix such as an infection
  • Placenta previa
  • Premature labor
Bleeding: When to be Concerned

Since bleeding could be a sign of a miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, or other serious problems, you must talk with your OBGYN about any bleeding you experience. You should call your doctor right away if,
  • Your bleeding lasts more than 24 hours
  • Bleeding is heavy or you pass blood clots or tissue
  • Your bleeding is accompanied by abdominal pain, fevers, or chills
If you have any concerns about symptoms or issues during pregnancy, your OBGYN can provide you with the answers and care you need. Don’t ever hesitate to call your OBGYN if you are worried about bleeding or other problems. A simple phone call can determine whether you need to come in for an evaluation.

By Womens Health Care of Warren
January 13, 2021
Category: OBGYN Care
Tags: Bladder Infection  
Bladder InfectionHaving trouble going? It could be due to a bladder infection.

You’ve been running back and forth to the bathroom all day and you’ve noticed an increased urgency to pee, even after you’ve just gone. What gives? Well, if you notice burning or pain with urination you could very well be dealing with a bladder infection. Most people will experience a bladder infection at least once during their lifetime. If you are experiencing symptoms of a bladder infection you may want to call your OBGYN for a checkup.

What are the signs of a bladder infection?

Bladder infections are one of the most common urinary tract infections (UTIs). If you have a bladder infection you may experience,
  • Strong-smelling urine
  • Cloudy urine
  • Increased urgency and frequency of urination
  • Abdominal cramping
  • Burning with urination
  • Pain that lingers after urinating
If you are experiencing symptoms of a bladder infection you must see your OBGYN right away for treatment. Bladder infections will require prescription medication to treat the infection. If left untreated, bacteria from the bladder can spread to the kidneys, leading to intense back pain, chills, fever, and vomiting.

How is a bladder infection treated?

Your OBGYN will prescribe an oral antibiotic to kill the bacteria in the bladder. You may also receive medication to ease burning and pain with urination. You must be drinking plenty of fluids to flush out bacteria in the bladder.

You should see an improvement in your symptoms after 2 days of taking the antibiotics, but you mustn’t stop taking your medication once you start to feel better, as the infection can return.

Is there a way to prevent bladder infections?

There are certain lifestyle adjustments that you can make to prevent the development of a bladder infection. Some of these habits include,
  • Drinking enough water every day
  • Taking showers over a bath
  • Not douching or using scented feminine products
  • Wearing loose-fitting clothes
  • Urinating immediately before and after intercourse
From bladder infections to birth control options, your OBGYN can be an invaluable source to turn to for treatment and care. If you are dealing with recurring bladder infections, you’ll definitely want to talk with your OBGYN to find out what could be causing your frequent infections.